Confused Feminist As a Girl

1957

Growing up with five younger brothers marked me for life. For a good 16 years I was taller and stronger and smarter. Looking at old pictures that show me towering over my brothers, I mourn loss opportunities for cutting them down to size:) I recall asking the nun preparing us for Holy Communion why the boys went up to the altar first. “Because they are closer to God since they can be priests,” was her reply. At that moment I became a feminist. I confess I was less interested in solidarity with women than in besting men. I felt outraged when my brother could be an altar boy and I couldn’t even though my Latin was infinitely better.

My immediate neighborhood had no girls to play with, only boys, so I coped by becoming a tomboy, passionately interested in baseball. My brothers used to challenge their friends to ask me a baseball question I couldn’t answer. My family always encouraged academic achievement. I was a shy intellectual in high school; my friends hung out at the high school newspaper and the debate club. None of us dated. I concluded that smart girls didn’t attract men unless they deliberately played dumb, something I refused to do. Besides my ideal male was Jack Kennedy.

Although my mom started college when I did, she was in what my brother Stephen calls her creative phase when I was growing up. A full-time mother, she sewed most of my clothes, canned tomatoes, made hats, made sock monkeys when she wasn’t taking care of six kids and incredibly active in her local church. My father was the brain; we minimized my mom’s great intelligence. I didn’t want to be my mom.

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About maryjograves

Children are my passion. I have 4 daughters, 5 grandkids under 5 with another on the way, 5 younger brothers, 11 nieces and nephews, 8 great nieces and nephews. I advocate a revolution for a child friendly US. I have been an editor, public librarian, social worker, and internet educator. Tweet @RedstockingGran @ChildrensWings
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